Course specifications

Cairo University

Faculty of Medicine

Department of Medical Pharmacology

 

Course Specifications

Course title: Medical Pharmacology                            Code: PHA-308.

 

·         Department offering the course: Medical Pharmacology.

·         Third academic year of M.B.& B.Ch. program

·         Date of specification approval: 7 / 9 / 2010

 

            A) Basic information:

·         Allocated marks: 300 marks.

·         Course duration: 30 weeks.

·         Teaching hours:

o       Theoretical: 120 hours.

o       Practical: 60 hours.

 

            B) Professional information:

1- Overall aim of the course:

·        To provide the basic knowledge about commonly used groups of drugs affecting different body systems and their implications in therapy of disease and health promotion.

·        To enable students to understand the safe use of drugs as regards adverse effects, contraindications and drug interactions.

2- Intended learning outcomes (ILOs):

A- Knowledge and understanding:

   by the end of the course, students should be able to:

A.1-Describe the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and pharmacotherapeutic properties of different groups of drugs affecting body systems. (p-ilo-a.7)

A.2-Describe the adverse and toxic effects, and their management of commonly used groups of drugs. (p-ilo-a.7)

A.3-Define the limitations to the use of drugs such as contraindications and drug interactions. (p-ilo-a.7)

A.4-Explain clinically relevant age, sex and genetic related variations that affect response to drugs (p-iloa.7 & 9).

A.5-Describe the pathophysiology of diseases and explain the rational basis for the use of drugs (p-ilo-a.6).

A.6-Explain the impact of preventive pharmacology in promoting health and prevent illness (p—ilo-a.10).

A.7- Describe the use of life saving drugs. (p-ilo-a.7)

A.8-Define the principles and applications of gene therapy (p-ilo-a.9).

A.9-Recognize the rational and general guidelines of the use of drugs in the proper dose in special population such as pediatrics, geriatrics, pregnancy and lactation and in cases of liver and kidney impairment. (p-ilo-a.7)

A.12-Define the basis of pharmaco-economics. (p-ilo-a.8)

 

B- Professional and practical skills:

     by the end of the course, students should be able to

B.1- Work out drug dosage based on patient's criteria and health condition. (p-ilo-b.1 & 8)

B.2- Write safe prescriptions for selected common and important diseases. (p-ilo-b.1 & 9)

B.3- Practice enteral, parenteral, inhalation; including the use of nebulizers; and topical methods for drug administration. (p-ilo-b.1, 13 & 18)

B.4- Design rational therapeutic strategies for both acute and chronic conditions that take into account the various variables that influence these strategies (p-ilo-b.1, 5 & 6).

            C- Professional attitude and behavioral skills:

     by the end of the course, students should be able to

C.1- Respect the patient right to know and share in decision making as regards the choice of drugs. (p-ilo-c.2)

C.2- Understand and respect the different cultural beliefs and values that affect the use of certain drug groups. (p—ilo-c.3)

C.3- Respect ethics related to drug prescription and use especially to drugs liable to produce abuse. (p-ilo-c.5)

            D- Communication skills:

            E- Intellectual skills:

     by the end of the course, students should be able to

E.1- Analyze the mode and mechanism of action of known and unknown drugs on various biological tissues and systems. (p-ilo-e.3)

E.2- Calculate accurately drug’s dosage, bioavailability, plasma half life and volume of distribution in different patient populations. (p-ilo-e.1)

E.3- Combine clinical and investigational data with evidence based knowledge for clinical problem solving. (p-ilo-e.3)

E.4- Design a pharmacological plan for management of common diseases and emergencies. (p-iilo-e.5) 

           

F- General and transferable skills:

     by the end of the course, students should be able to:

F.1- Adopt the principles of lifelong learning needed for continuous professional development. (p-ilo-f.1)

F.2- Use computers effectively in reaching biomedical information to remain current with advances in knowledge and practice. (p-ilo-f.2)

F.3- Present information clearly in written, electronic and verbal forms. (p-ilo-f.3)

 

3- Course contents:

 

Topics

Teaching hours

Total

%

Lectures

Practical & clinical

Total

1- general pharmacology

2- autonomic nervous system

3- ocular pharmacology

4- skeletal muscle relaxants

5- autacoids and their modulators

6- respiration

7- renal pharmacology

8- cardio-vascular pharmacology

9- blood and blood forming organs

10- psycho-neuro-pharmacology

11- hormones and their antagonists

12- gastro-intestinal tract

13- chemotherapy + local antiseptics

14- drug interactions

15- chelating agents

16- vitamins and food supplements

17- immuno-pharmacology

18- pharmaco-economics

19- pharmacogenetics

20- prescription writing

21- evidence based medicine

11

16

2

2

4

4

4

16

5

16

11

6

16

2

1

1

1

1

1

-

-

14

12

4

-

-

2

-

12

-

2

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

2

25

28

6

2

4

6

4

28

5

18

15

10

16

2

1

1

1

1

1

4

2

13.9

15.6

3.3

1.1

2.2

3.3

2.2

15.6

2.8

10

8.3

5.6

8.9

1.1

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.6

0.6

2.2

1.1

Total

120

60

180

100

 

A) Topics:

1.      General pharmacology: routes of drug administration, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and use of drugs in special population and situations such as geriatrics. Basis of alternative and complementary medicine

2.      Autonomic nervous system & drugs affecting the ganglia.

3.      Ocular pharmacology : drugs affecting the eye and treatment of glaucoma.

4.      Skeletal muscle relaxants :centrally and peripherally acting drugs.

5.      Autacoids : histamine , serotonin, endogenous peptides and eicosanoids, and their modulators.

6.      Respiration: cough therapy and treatment of bronchial asthma.

7.      Renal pharmacology : diuretics, acidification and alkalinization of urine.

8.      Cardiovascular system : anti-hypertensive drugs and treatment of ischemic heart diseases, heart failure and dysrhythmias.

9.      Blood and blood forming organs : treatment of coagulation defects, anemia and dysrlipidemia.

10.  Psycho- neuro pharmacology : analgesics, sedatives, hypnotics and anxiolytics. Antipsychotics, antidepressants, anticovulsants  and antiparkinsonism. General and local anaesthesia and  .n.s. stimulants.

11.  Hormones and their antagonists : insulin, oral hypoglycemic, adrenal steroids, thyroid gland, sex hormones, pituitary hormones and calcium homeostasis.

12.  G.i.t. : acid disorders, emetic and ant emetic drugs and purgatives.

13.  Chemotherapy : b- lactam antibiotics, aminoglycosides, broad spectrum antibiotics, macrolide, quinolones , sulphonamides, antifungal, antiviral, therapy of tuberculosis, anti-amoebic, anti  alarial, antibilharzial and cancer chemotherapy.

14.  Drug interaction.

15.  Chelating agents.

16.  Vitamins and food supplements.

17.  Immunopharmacology

18.  Pharmaco- economics.

19.  Pharmacogenetics.

20.  Prescription writing.

 

B) Practical & applied pharmacology (15 classes):

1- Dosage forms and routes of drug administration (5 weeks).

2- Effect of drugs on isolated heart (2 weeks).

3- Effect of drugs on isolated intestine (2 weeks).

4- Applied ocular pharmacology (2 weeks).

5- Effect of drugs on blood pressure (2 weeks).

6- Pharmacokinetic concepts (2 weeks).

 

C) Clinical pharmacology (15 classes) :

1- Evidence based medicine and art of prescription writing (2 weeks)

2- Ischemic heart diseases “angina + myocardial infractions” (2 weeks).

3- Hypertension (2 weeks).

4- Heart failure (one week).

5- Bronchial asthma (one week).

6- Peptic ulcer (one week).

7- Diabetes mellitus (2 weeks).

8- Rheumatic fever (one week).

9- Rationale of antimicrobial use (one week).

10- Drugs in special patient groups (2 weeks).

 

4- Teaching and learning methods:

A-    Methods used:

1.      Lectures.

2.      Tutorial (small group teaching):

A- Experimental modules during the first semester

B- Clinical modules during the second semester

B-    Teaching plan:

1.      Lectures:  one hour / lecture, five days / week. Students are divided into 5 subgroups that attend at 5 lecture halls and taught by 5 different staff at the same time.

2.      Experimental classes: two hours / week each. Students are divided into 10 groups, which are sub-divided into 30 small groups.

3.      Clinical tutorial classes: two hours / week each. Students are divided into 10 groups, which are sub-divided into 30 small groups.

 

C-    Time plan:

Item

Time schedule

Total hours

1- lectures

 

2- experimental classes

 

3- clinical classes

One hour lecture x 5days / week x 24 weeks

One experimental class / week x 2 hours each x 15 weeks

One clinical session / week x 2 hours each x 15 weeks

120

 

30

 

30

    total

30 weeks

180 hours

 

 

5- Students assessment methods:

A) Attendance criteria: faculty bylaws

 

B) Assessment tools:

Tool

Purpose (ilos)

Written examination

To assess a.1–12, e.2 & 4, and f.3.

Oral examination

To assess a.1–a.12, c.1-3, e.3 & f.3.

Practical examination

To assess b.1-4 and e.1-4.

Assignment

To assess f.1-3.

 

C) Time schedule:  faculty bylaws

Exam

Week

1- quiz exam

Not predetermined

1- first half of the academic year

7

2- mid-year exam

16

3- second half of the academic year

23

4- practical exam

28

5- final exam

30

 

 

 

 

D) Grading system:

Examination

Marks allocated

% of total marks

1- quiz exams of first semester

4

1.3

2- mid-year

48 (30 theoretical + 18 practical modules)

16

3- quiz exams of second semester

4

1.3

4- assignment

4

1.3

5- practical

50 (4 clinical cases x 10 + 2prescriptions x5)

16.7

6- final written

150

1- first day: short answered question = 80 marks

2- second day: mcqs = 70 marks

50

7- oral

40 (two sessions x 20)

13.3

Total

300 marks

100%

         The minimum passing & passing grades (faculty bylaws).

E) examinassions description:

Examination

Description

1- quiz exams

Short answered questions, m.c.qs. And e.m.qs.

2- first half

Short answered questions, m.c.qs. And e.m.qs.

3- mid-year

Short answered questions, m.c.qs. And e.m.qs.

4- second half

Short answered questions, m.c.qs. And e.m.qs.

5- practical

Objectively structured questions such as m.c.qs. And e.m.qs, and prescription writing

6- final written:

Short answered questions, m.c.qs. And e.m.qs.

7- oral

Table cards

6- assignments

Write an essay on provided topics.

 

6- list of references:

A-    Basic materials:

"Applied pharmacology" by staff members of pharmacology department.

 

B-    Recommended books:

1.      "Lippincott's illustrated reviews – pharmacology", editors harvey r.a. and champ r.c.

2.      "Pharmacology", editors rang p.a.; et al.

3.      "Clinical pharmacology", editors laurance d.r. and bennett p.n.

4.      "Basic & clinical pharmacology", editor katzung g.k.

 

 

 

 

C-    Others:

1.      CDs Prepared by staff members and provided by the vice dean for education and students' affairs.

2.      www.drugs.com

3.      www.bnf.org

 

 

7- facilities required for teaching and learning:

Facilities used for teaching this course include:

1- Lecture halls:

At the building of lecture halls and the big lecture halls a & b.

2- Laboratory classes:

Laboratories in the pharmacology department. All labs are equipped with adequate facilities for these types of experiments such as data acquisition and projection electronic devices, organ bath, recording graphs, chemicals and animals.

3- Clinical classes:

Suitably equipped small rooms and two halls in the pharmacology department.

4- Library:

At the third floor of the department.

 

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